rubyetc:

mainly spongy

comedycentral:

The Colbert Report is all-new tonight!

frankenfemme:

janemba:

balenciago:

Does Kendall Jenner realize no one in the fashion industry likes her

no one likes anyone everyone is a hater get money

by no one you mean fashion bloggers? that blog for free?

(via monicalewinsky1996)

jonasbrothers:

cokeflow:

Shrek came out 13 years ago

I didn’t know shrek was gay

(via laughbitches)

YOU’RE TOO GOOD AT WHAT YOU DO (list of amazing actress and some of their movies):
↳ Anne Hathaway “"I kind of got my big break with ‘The Princess Diaries’ and during the press rounds for that everyone asked me: ‘Did you always want to be a princess growing up?’ And the truth was, no I wanted to be Catwoman."

(via laughbitches)

forever:

i’m pretty sure by now “tired” is just part of my personality description

(via laughbitches)

unfollovving:

agronsbutt:

morbutts:

canklequeen:

99.9% of the people on this website are stupid

i am the 1%

dumbass you mean 0.1%

(via laughbitches)

Perhaps the rare and simple pleasure of being seen for what one is compensates for the misery of being it. — Margaret Drabble (via kushandwizdom)

18004206969:

Yes. I’d like some bird seeds, thank you. and how long does it usually take for the birds to grow.

(via kohwala)

dippincountryboy:

I need a few cold beers, pizza, some rough sex, then cuddle and watch Netflix.

(via marijuanote)

rhamphotheca:

End-Permian extinction happened in 60,000 years—much faster than earlier estimates, MIT study says The largest mass extinction in the history of animal life occurred some 252 million years ago, wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of life on land—including the largest insects known to have inhabited the Earth. Multiple theories have aimed to explain the cause of what’s now known as the end-Permian extinction, including an asteroid impact, massive volcanic eruptions, or a cataclysmic cascade of environmental events. But pinpointing the cause of the extinction requires better measurements of how long the extinction period lasted.
Now researchers at MIT have determined that the end-Permian extinction occurred over 60,000 years, give or take 48,000 years—practically instantaneous, from a geologic perspective. The new timescale is based on more precise dating techniques, and indicates that the most severe extinction in history may have happened more than 10 times faster than scientists had previously thought…
(read more: PhysOrg) (Image: © John Sibbick / Natural History Museum)

rhamphotheca:

End-Permian extinction happened in 60,000 years—much faster than earlier estimates, MIT study says

The largest mass extinction in the history of animal life occurred some 252 million years ago, wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of life on land—including the largest insects known to have inhabited the Earth. Multiple theories have aimed to explain the cause of what’s now known as the end-Permian extinction, including an asteroid impact, massive volcanic eruptions, or a cataclysmic cascade of environmental events. But pinpointing the cause of the extinction requires better measurements of how long the extinction period lasted.

Now researchers at MIT have determined that the end-Permian extinction occurred over 60,000 years, give or take 48,000 years—practically instantaneous, from a geologic perspective. The new timescale is based on more precise dating techniques, and indicates that the most severe extinction in history may have happened more than 10 times faster than scientists had previously thought…

(read more: PhysOrg)

(Image: © John Sibbick / Natural History Museum)

(via jmonii)

(via dylancunt)